Sunni News has been mentioned by The National Bureau of Asian Research


Sunni News mentioned in a International Journal[1]NBR special Report #22 | February 2010

Who Speaks For Islam?

Muslim Grassroots Leaders and Popular Preachers in South Asia.

 

29

Muslim Grassroots Leaders in India: National Issues and Local Leadership

Dietrich Reetz

33 Muslim grassroots leaders in India U Reetz

with madaris, modern Muslim schools with a secular curriculum, and madaris for girls with other modern girls’ schools. These schools are operated through Muslim NGOs that have expanded all over India. Often these institutions are cross-linked and coordinated by activists who bridge the religious and the secular realms effortlessly, as they are also engaged in business with, invest in, or direct some of the new Muslim media.

Over the years many centers of religious learning have built impressive websites containing a large amount of information. A prominent example is the traditional seminary of Deoband featuring information regarding curriculum, the history of the seminary, magazines in Urdu (Darul Ulum) and Arabic (al-Dai), ordering information for their books in Urdu and English, an online service for religious verdicts (fatawa), and a photo gallery.4 The other orthodox seminary of North India, Nadwatul Ulama, has taken a similar approach in its website, which also provides easy connections with the seminary’s many Indian branches.5 The Deobandi-dominated association of Islamic clerics, Jamiat-Ulama-i-Hind (JUH), has modernized its web presentation, which introduces the association’s social and religious projects.6

Adherents of the Barelwi tradition of Sufi-oriented Islam, although their institutions and associations are less organized, use modern media to connect to each other. Internet blogs such as Sunni News not only help to circulate news and theological concepts but also promote sectarian debate.7 The youthful missionary movement of this tradition, Sunni Dawat-e Islami,8 which formed after the model of the Tablighi Jamaat, also possesses a modern web presence, offering podcasts, an e-journal, and e-books.

In the Indian context, the All India Muslim Personal Law Board (founded in 1973) acquired importance as a reference institution, and more so with a freshly renovated website.9 Run by religious scholars (ulema), the board’s decisions have a fatwa-like status, as it tries to reconcile different Sunni legal opinions.

33 Muslim grassroots leaders in India U Reetz

with madaris, modern Muslim schools with a secular curriculum, and madaris for girls with other modern girls’ schools. These schools are operated through Muslim NGOs that have expanded all over India. Often these institutions are cross-linked and coordinated by activists who bridge the religious and the secular realms effortlessly, as they are also engaged in business with, invest in, or direct some of the new Muslim media.

Over the years many centers of religious learning have built impressive websites containing a large amount of information. A prominent example is the traditional seminary of Deoband featuring information regarding curriculum, the history of the seminary, magazines in Urdu (Darul Ulum) and Arabic (al-Dai), ordering information for their books in Urdu and English, an online service for religious verdicts (fatawa), and a photo gallery.4 The other orthodox seminary of North India, Nadwatul Ulama, has taken a similar approach in its website, which also provides easy connections with the seminary’s many Indian branches.5 The Deobandi-dominated association of Islamic clerics, Jamiat-Ulama-i-Hind (JUH), has modernized its web presentation, which introduces the association’s social and religious projects.6

 

Adherents of the Barelwi tradition of Sufi-oriented Islam, although their institutions and associations are less organized, use modern media to connect to each other. Internet blogs such as Sunni News not only help to circulate news and theological concepts but also promote sectarian debate.7 The youthful missionary movement of this tradition, Sunni Dawat-e Islami,8 which formed after the model of the Tablighi Jamaat, also possesses a modern web presence, offering podcasts, an e-journal, and e-books.

 In the Indian context, the All India Muslim Personal Law Board (founded in 1973) acquired importance as a reference institution, and more so with a freshly renovated website.9 Run by religious scholars (ulema), the board’s decisions have a fatwa-like status, as it tries to reconcile different Sunni legal opinions.

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4 comments

  1. AOA, I am Friend of you in Facebook, I want u to publish a Article in Your Website https://sunninews.wordpress.com/ it is About IASinfo

    Join IASinfo to 9219592195.

    I have my own Group in facebook MUSLIM IAS ASPIRANTS do join there.

    Pls Give little Space in your Website for IASinfo

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