Tag Archives: Quran

Celebrating ‘Eid ul-Fitr: a time of joy

10 Aug

A very beautiful article on Eid Celebration by Mufti Ali Goma (Grand Mufti of Egypt)
Untitled
 Man is naturally disposed to celebrations. Festive celebrations are rooted in the distant past since man has specified certain days for commemorating a day or event such as victories and births, with ceremonies and rejoicing. Each community has designated specific days of festivities when people wear their best, manifest their joy and put away their cares on these occasions.

When the Prophet emigrated to al-Medina, he found that the people there observed two feasts of pagan origin which they observed with festivities and play. He did not renounce the idea and sanctioned celebrations with national, social and religious characteristics. He substituted these days with another two connected with two of the greatest Islamic rites—the day of breaking the fast (after Ramadan) and the day of sacrifice.

Allah established the day of breaking the fast after Ramadan a feast for Muslims. On this day, people exchange felicitations and visit each other. On this day they express their mercy and affection, display their finery and enjoy the blessings of Allah.

On this day, they express their love and brotherhood all for the sake of Allah. And by the mercy of Allah, this joyous day is commenced with the prayer of ‘Eid, which Muslims from all the different social classes offer at the same time in congregation; they glorify and praise Allah and thank Him for guiding them. They are compassionate towards their poor and needy brothers offering them food and money to spare them the need to beg on this day. On this day, Muslims set aside their worldly troubles to pray with their brothers and exchange felicities and goodwill, thereby combining between communion with Allah through acts of worship and fellow Muslims through cooperation, mercy and fellowship.

The day of ‘Eid ul-fitr invokes Divine bounties which include:

– It is the first day following the month of Ramadan. On this day, restrictions relating to food and drink and sexual intercourse (for married couples) are lifted after a period of voluntary abstention by which Muslims declare their willingness to forsake these pleasures for the greater purpose of attaining the pleasure of Allah and His forgiveness. On this day, Muslims rejoices over having fulfilled their duty of obeying Allah and for attaining its reward attested to by the words of the Messenger who said, “A faster has two moments of joy: one when he breaks the fast (at the end of the month) and another when he meets his Lord.”

Commemorating this event

It is recommended to commemorate this day by making dhikr, praying or observing other acts of worship, especially offering salat ul-tasabih (Tasabih prayer) due to its excellence expressed in the hadith, “Whoever spends the eve of the two ‘Eids worshipping Allah and hoping to attain its reward, his heart will remain after he ceases to exist/ die along with him.” It has been suggested that a dead heart refers to a heart that is passionately fond of this world, or disbelief, the horrors of the day of resurrection. Ibn ‘Abbas (may Allah be pleased with them both) said that a heart is kept alive by offering the night prayer in congregation, resolving to pray the dawn prayer in congregation and by making supplications in both.

The takbirs said in the ‘Eid

The takbirs of the two ‘Eids are a sunnah according to the opinion of the majority of scholars. After the verses on fasting, Allah the Almighty says,
(He wants you) to complete the prescribed period, and to glorify him in that He has guided you. [Al-Baqarah, 185]

The takbirs referred to in this verse are those performed on ‘Eid ul-fitr while that mentioned the verses on pilgrimage refer to ‘Eid ul-adha. Allah says,
Remember Allah during the appointed days. [Al-Baqarah, 203]
To attain benefits and celebrate God’s name, on specified days, over the livestock He has provided for them. [Al-Hajj, 28]
He has thus made them subject to you, that ye may glorify Allah for His guidance to you. [Al-Hajj, 37]

Ibn Hazm said, “The takbirs made on the eve of the day of ‘Eid al-fitr are obligatory but those made on the eve of ‘Eid ul-adha are praiseworthy. Allah the Almighty says, And to glorify Him in that He has guided you; and perchance ye shall be grateful. [Al-Baqarah, 183]

Therefore, takbirs become obligatory upon the after completion of the fast of Ramadan. One instance of takbir fulfills the obligation.”
To make takbir is to exalt Allah and in the context of ‘Eid, it is to exalt Allah and establish His greatness through the words ‘Allahu akbar’ which denote Allah’s Divine oneness. This is because the superlative form necessitates the diminution of everything else and any diminutive entity is not deserving of divinity. Allah is free from imperfections and, for this reason, takbir was legislated in prayers to nullify prostrations to other than Allah; in hajj when sacrificing to nullify what people used to sacrifice to their idols; and at the end of the month of fasting indicating that Allah is worshipped through fasting and that He is the One True God in the face of the falsehood of the idols.

It is because of this that Muslims were instructed to make takbir en route to the ‘Eid prayer and for the imam to make takbir in the ‘Eid sermon.
It is recommended to start making takbir when the sun sets on the eve of the day of the two ‘Eids. A person is to keep making takbir at his home, on the road and in mosques and markets by raising his voice (for men) and uttering the relevant expressions until the imam of the ‘Eid prayer announces the start of prayer. A person, who is not praying behind an imam, is to continue his takbir until the imam finishes the ‘Eid prayer and sermons.

Nothing specific concerning the phrasing of takbir has been mentioned in the sunnah. However, some of the Companions such as Salman al-Farsi used to make takbir saying:

Allahu akbar, Allahu akbar, Allahu akbar. La ilaha illa Allah. Allahu akbar, Allahu akbar, wa lillahi al-hamd (Allah is the greatest, Allah is the greatest, Allah is the greatest. There is no god save Allah. Allah is the greatest, Allah is the greatest, praise be to Allah).

The order to do this is non-specific since the textual basis for it is unrestricted. Allah the Almighty says, [He wants you to complete the prescribed period] and to glorify Him for having guided you. [Al-Baqarah, 185]

Unrestricted matters must remain unrestricted until something in Islamic law comes to restrict them. Since long ago, Egyptians have used the well-known takbir phrasing of:

Allahu akbar, Allahu akbar, Allahu akbar. La ilaha illa Allah. Allahu akbar, Allahu akbar, wa lillahi al-hamd. Allahu akbarkabira wa al-hamdullahi kathira wa subhana Allahu bukratan wa asila. La ilaha illa Allah wahdah. Sadaqa wa’dah wa nasara ‘abdah, wa a’azza jundahu wa hazama al-ahzaba wahdah, la ilaha illa Allah. Wa la na’budu illa iya mukhliseen lahu al-deena wa law kkariha al-kafirun. Allahuma salli ‘ala sayidina Mohammed wa ‘ala ali sayidina Mohammed, wa ‘ala as-habi sayidina Mohammed, wa ‘ala ansari sayidina Mohammed, wa ‘ala azwaj sayidina Mohammed, wa ‘ala dhuriyyati sayidina Mohammed wa salim tasliman kathira.

(Allahu akbar, Allahu akbar, Allahu akbar. There is no god but Allah. Allahu akbar, Allahu akbar, praise be to Allah. Allah is ever greatest, much praise be to Allah. Glory to Him day and night, there is no god but Allah. He fulfilled His promise, gave victory to His slave, strengthened His army, and He alone we worship, being sincere in our religion even though the believers are averse. O Allah! Make your prayers and blessings be upon our master Mohammed, upon the family of our master Mohammed, upon the companions of our Master Mohammed, and upon the supporters of our master Mohammed, and upon the wives of our master Mohammed and upon the descendants of our master Mohammed, in abundance).

It is a valid legal formulation and Imam Al-Shafi’I commented upon it saying, “If one says Allahu akbar as people do nowadays, it is a good thing. If he adds more takbirs then it is also good. Any remembrance of Allah he adds I deem good.”

Adding praise and blessings upon our master Mohammed and his family, Companions, supporters, wives and descendants at the end of takbirs has a legitimate legal basis. The best form is one that combines mention of Allah and His Prophet. Praising him opens the doors of acceptance for our deeds; the scholars have said that saying prayers upon the Prophet are always accepted—even from hypocrites—since it is related to his Excellency, our master the Prophet.

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Saudi Govt. detained Sunni Muslims for showing respect at Medina Shareef:Raza Academy protested

22 Jul

Mumbai:22nd July

Prominent organization of Indian Sunni Muslims,Raza Academy has written a protest letter to Saudi King Abdullah to change its governments behavior towards Sunni pilgrims who pays respect at Roza-e-Rasool Sallallaholaihiwasalam (Holy grave of Prophet Hazrat Muhammad) in Medina.Raza Academy in its protest letter has attracted King Abdullah’s attention towards a  regular feature in which religious Mutawwa Police of Saudi Arabia harasses Muslim pilgrims at Holy places in and around Masjid-e-Nabwi and makkah Shareef.

Press Release

It should be rembered that Mutawwa Police is regulated by Salafi ideology in Saudi Arabia which consider it to Biddah and Shirk means against Islam to pay tribute and respect at Holy graves of Jannatul Baqi and Jannatul Moalla as well as at Roza-e-Rasool Sallallahoalihiwassam .Thousands of pilgrims regularly complain these harassment by Mutawwa Police in Saudi Arabia but Kingdom shows no attention towards it.This Police is very  controversial Police which works on unreasonable and illogical laws and rules made by Wahabi -Salafi Board.

Raza Academy has attarcted attention of Saudi King towards an incident where two Muslims of India were harrased and detained by this Police on false and filmsy grounds.According to letter they were just paying tributes at holy places and Mutawwa argued with them and arrested them with out any reason.Raza Academy has demanded immediate release of both of these Muslims.

The copy of the letter has  been sent to Saudi Embassy in New Delhi,Mumbai and to Indian government for necessary action.

Dawat-ul-Quran is distributing Ramadan Charity in India

20 Jul

Narrated by Mu’adh ibn Jabal (Radiallahu ta’ala Anhu) that, The Prophet Muhammad (Sallal laahu alaihi wasallam) said: “Charity obliterates sins just as water extinguishes fire.” Tirmidhi #1527

Charity Begins at Home, Perhaps the greatest CHARITY comes

When we are kind to each other, when we don’t judge or categorize someone else,

When we simply give each other The Benefit of the doubt or remain quiet.

CHARITY

is accepting someone’s differences, Weaknesses, and shortcomings;

Having patience with someone who has let us down Or resisting the impulse to become offended when someone doesn’t handle Something the way we might have hoped.

 CHARITY is refusing to take advantage of an other’s weakness & being willing to forgive someone who has hurt us.

 CHARITY is expecting the Best of Each Other.

 The Prophet Muhammad (Sallal laahu alaihi wasallam) said:

 “Feed the hungry, visit the sick and set free the captives.” Sahih Al- Bukhari

This year also, Dawat ul Qur’an have come up with a plan to feed the poor Muslims during this auspicious month of Ramadan Kareem. It is our responsibility to utilize the collected funds interims of Zakat/Fitra/Charity/Sadaqa in a manner where it reaches to the needy Muslims.

Alhamdulillah Dawatul Qur’an successfully distributing its Ration kits to hundreds of families living in the slums, many of these families live in shanty huts made from scrap metal and other garbage.

By the Grace of Almighty Allah Dawatul Qur’an works to provide poor needy Muslims with food to help get satisfied hunger.

Join Us to serve Ummah!

Ration Distribution Program 2013

Sl.no

Particulars

Quantity

Price

1

Rice

6 Kg

313

2

Wheat flour

5 Kg

121

3

Oil

1 Ltr

92

4

Toor Dal

500 g

40

5

Masoor Dal

500 g

40

6

Moong Dal

150 g

11

7

Sugar

2 Kg

66

8

Salt

1 Kg

12

9

Soji

1 Kg

30

10

Sawaiyya

1 Kg

21

11

Date – fruits

1 Kg

40

Total Amount

 

786

 Per Kit 786 INR

To transfer from Banks in India:

ICICI Bank

M/s – DAWAT-UL-QURAN TRUST

A/c # – 025105006921 

IFSC Code – ICIC0000251 

Jayanagar 7th Block Branch

 Bangalore – 560082,

Since we don’t have Foreign Currency Acceptance certificate, we request you to please use the below account.

To transfer other Countries:

State Bank of India

   M/s: Mohammed Azam Sharieff

A/c#-20069392454

IFSC Code:  SBIN0012705

Savings Account

Subramanya Arcade Branch

Bangalore-560029

MENTION RDPZAKAT, RDP – CHARITY, RDP – FITRA

 In the transaction remarks while transferring online

Dawatul Qur’an  is a registered, non profit and non political organization to serve the humanity in general and Muslim ummah (community) in particular by hand down the teaching of the Prophet Muhammad (sallallahu alaihi wasallam) to succeed in both the worlds i.e. this world and thereafter.

Jazakallahu Khairan

Dawatul Qur’an

“Seek knowledge from Cradle to Grave”

PO Box No: 4154 Bangalore- 560041

Venue:  No 79, 31st A Cross I 4th T Block I Jayanagar I Bangalore – 560041

In India: +91 98447 87285

                 +91 9886915577

In UAE: +971555414054

                  +971562998734  

www.dawatulquran.org

www.facebook.com/dawatulquran.org

www.youtube.com/dawatulquran

AL-GHAZALI AS AN ISLAMIC REFORMER

17 Jul

An Evaluative Study of the Attempts of the Imam Abu H?amid
al-Ghazali at Islamic Reform

Notwithstanding the enduring and rich “legacy of is?lah? (Islamic reform),” the study of
it is relatively scarce and remarkably limited to the modern times. The present study attempts to shed some light on this legacy by evaluating the contribution of an
outstanding pre-modern Muslim scholar, al-Ghazali. Surprisingly, some studies create
an absolutely positive picture of him, while others portray him in an extremely negative light. Thus, this study raises the question of whether it is justifiable to classify him as a mus?lih? (Islamic reformer).

In light of the analysis of the concept “is?lah?” and the complexity of al-Ghazali’s time, the study demonstrates his lifeexperience and erifies that he devoted himself to general is?lah?at a late period of his life, after succeeding in his self-is?lah?. Further, the study assesses his is?lah?i teachings in general, namely those formulated in the Ih?ya’, and evaluates the claimed effects of his attempts at is?lah?. The study also highlights a number of strengths and weaknesses of al-Ghazali’s efforts and critically discusses some of the criticism directed at him.

By weighing up the points for and against al-Ghazali, this study concludes by
asserting that classifying him as a muslih? appears to be fairly justified.

http://www.yanabi.com/uploads/84fd6779b889423c29487ef7000043f8.pdf

http://www.ghazali.org/

Ajmer Sharif Urs 2011 :Pilgrimage of peace | Sadia Dehlavi

9 Jun

Pilgrimage of peace | Deccan Chronicle.

Initiated in the Chishti Sufi order, I find Ajmer to be the kaabah of my heart. On the 6th of Rajab, June 9 (the seventh Islamic month), I look forward to participating in the 799th Urs festivities of Khwaja Gharib Nawaz. Along with hundreds of thousands of devotees, I queue for long hours to touch the threshold, usually getting my chance in the middle of the night.

Musicians come to seek the blessings of Khwaja because the beginnings of Sufi music assemblies are attributed to him. Late Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan attributed his success to Khwaja’s benevolence and so does A.R. Rahman. Innumerable qawwal groups of the subcontinent arrive at the dargah to sing praises of Khwaja: “Baruti mehfil shahana mubarak bashad, saqia badao paimana mubarak basahad, ilahi ta abd astana-e-yar rahe, yeh asra hai gharibon ka barqarar rahe…”

(Felicitation to thee for this blessed majestic assembly, O wine pourer, felicitations on your goblet of sacred wine. Oh God, may this threshold of the beloved exist for ever, may this refuge of the poor remain for ever…)

The Chishti Sufi order derives its name from Chisht, a small town near Herat, Afghanistan. Khwaja Abu Ishaq Shami of Damascus established the Sufi order in Chisht where many of his spiritual successors lie buried. He mentored Khwaja Usman who came from Herwan, a town in Iran. On initiating him as a disciple, Hajji Sharif Zindani placed a four-edged cap on Khwaja Usman’s head explaining, “First is the renunciation of the world, second the renunciation of the Hereafter. Third, renunciation of the self and lastly, the renunciation of all else other than God”.

Khwaja Usman lived in the company of his Master for 30 years and died in the holy city of Mecca. The Chishti order gained popularity through the teachings of Khwaja Moinuddin Chishti. An outstanding figure in the history of Islamic mysticism. Drawn to mystics from early childhood, the quest for knowledge took Khwaja to centres of learning in Samaqand and Bukhara. Khwaja was bestowed with the title of “Gharib Nawaz”, Patron of the poor, in Medina. It was there that he received a spiritual inspiration to settle down in the Indian town of Ajmer. Khwaja laid down the founding principles for the Chishti order: “Develop river-like generosity, sun-like bounty and earth-like hospitality”. Gharib Nawaz stressed renouncing wealth, encouraging self-discipline and prayer. He preached tolerance, advocating respect for all religions. Khwaja’s inclusive message of peace and brotherhood brought hundreds of thousands to the fold of Islam. The Chishti order produced great Sufi masters, including Qutubuddin Bakhtiar Kaki, Baba Farid, Hazrat Nizamuddin Auliya, Naseeruddin Chiragh Dilli and Alauddin Sabir of Kaliyar. The Nizami and Sabri orders are among the numerous branches of the Chishti order. The Ajmer dargah, considered the most sacred in South Asia, attracts pilgrims from different religious and economic backgrounds in the quest of the Sufi master’s blessings.

— Sadia Dehlvi is a Delhi-based writer and author of Sufism: The Heart of Islam. She can be contacted at sadiafeedback@gmail.com

Weekly Dars-e-Quran :Towards Understanding Quran

15 Apr

15th April 2011

Juma Mubarak: Alhamdulillah MSO Okhla Delhi Unit is starting Dars-e-Quran in Masjid-e-Raza Zakir Nagar Street No.18 from 17th April 2011 time  11.00-12.00 Morning Every Sunday.

This First Sunday will be adressed by Maulana Yaseen Akhtar Misabhi Sahab. Darul Qalam Delhi.

MSO request u to attend in Large Numbers and bring  ur frnds about it

What is Ramadan? What do Muslims gain from fasting?

5 Sep

What is Ramadan?

Ramadan is the name of the ninth Islamic lunar month. It is the month Allah (The one God), ordered the Muslims to fast since it was the month He revealed the Qur’an (the Muslims’ holy scripture) to Muhammad (the final Prophet of Allah). Muslims abstain from eating, drinking and intimate relations with their spouse during the daylight hours of the blessed month. It is a time for Muslims to contemplate on their belief and increase their faith by actively increasing in worship, prayer and receiting the Qur’an. It is an opportunity for spiritual as well as physical purification.
Do Muslims not eat and drink for a whole month?

Ramadan celebration in Dubai

Ramadan celebration in Dubai

No. Muslims are ordered to abstain from food, drink and sensual pleasures from the break of dawn until sunset throughout the whole month. That means, that after sunset until the break of dawn of the following day, Muslims may eat and drink as they please. Many Muslims take this opportunity to invite friends and family over to share in the spirit of Ramadan
What do Muslims do during Ramadan?

Muslims usually wake before dawn to take a small meal called “suhoor”. They abstain from eating, drinking and sensual pleasures during the daylight hours of the blessed month. Muslims exert more effort in worship, praying, contemplating, helping others, giving charity, reciting the Quran (the holy book of the Muslims); many Muslims endeavour to complete the Qur’an’s recitation at least once during the month. At sunset, Muslims break their fast, usually with a big meal with family and friends. Many Muslims also attend the mosque at night, to engage in special night prayers called “taraweeh”.

Is Ramadan a Prophet of Islam?
No, Ramadan is not a Prophet of Islam. Ramadan is simply the name of the ninth month of the Islamic lunar calender. It happens to be the month that Allah (the One God) revealed the Qur’an, to Muhammad (the final Prophet of Allah). Islam believes and honours all the Prophets of the past as servants and Messengers of Allah, including Noah (Nooh), Abraham (Ibrahim), Moses (Musa) and Jesus (’Isa) May Allah send His peace upon them all. Muslims believe that Muhammad is the final Messenger of Allah, that the previous Messengers prophesised about. He preached the same message as those before him: “Worship Allah (the one God) alone, you have no god besides Him”.
Do children, sick and old people need to fast?

Fasting is only obligated on Muslims who have reached puberty, are sane and are healthy. So children who have not reached puberty are exempt, but are encouraged to fast some days, or a portion of a day, to train them for when they are obliged to fast. The temporarily sick who have a sickness that may extend a few days, where fasting may serverly affect them or prolong their recovery are not obliged to fast but must make up the days after Ramadan. The chronically ill and elderly, for example those with diabetes, are not obliged to fast, but should feed a needy or poor person for each day they miss.
How did the fast during Ramadan become obligatory for Muslims?

The revelations from God to the Prophet Muhammad that would eventually be compiled as the Quran began during Ramadan in the year 610, but the fast of Ramadan did not become a religious obligation for Muslims until the year 624. The obligation to fast is explained in the second chapter of the Quran: “O you who believe! Fasting is prescribed for you as it was prescribed for those before you, that you may become righteous…The month of Ramadhan [is that] in which was revealed the Qur’an, a guidance for the people and clear proofs of guidance and criterion. So whoever sights [the new moon of] the month, let him fast it;…” (Chapter 2, verses 183 and 185)
What do Muslims believe they gain from fasting?

One of the main benefits of Ramadan are an increased compassion for those in need of the necessities of life, a sense of self-purification and reflection and a renewed focus on spirituality. Muslims also appreciate the feeling of togetherness shared by family and friends throughout the month. Perhaps the greatest practical benefit is the yearly lesson in self-restraint and discipline that can carry forward to other aspects of a Muslim’s life such as work and education.
Why does Ramadan begin on a different day each year?

Because Ramadan is a lunar month, it begins about eleven days earlier each year. Throughout a Muslim’s lifetime, Ramadan will fall both during winter months, when the days are short, and summer months, when the days are long and the fast is more difficult. In this way, the difficulty of the fast is evenly distributed between Muslims living in the northern and southern hemispheres.
What is Lailat ul-Qadr?

Lailat ul-Qadr (”Night of Power”) marks the anniversary of the night on which the Prophet Muhammad first began receiving revelations from God, through the angel Gabriel. An entire chapter in the Quran deals with this night: “We have indeed revealed this (Message) in the Night of Power: and what will explain to thee what the Night of Power is? The Night of Power is better than a thousand months. Therein come down the angels and the Spirit by God’s permission, on every errand. Peace!…This until the rise of morn.” (Chapter 97) Muslims believe Lailat ul-Qadr is one of the last odd-numbered nights of Ramadan.
Is it difficult to perform the fast in Australia, Canada, USA, and UK?

In many ways, fasting in Australia, Canada, USA, and UK is easier than fasting in some of the African countries where the climate is extremely hot. This year at least, the number of daylight hours will be less than when Ramadan occurs during the summer. In Muslim countries, most people are observing the fast, so there are fewer temptations such as luncheon meetings, daytime celebrations and offers of food from friends. Many Australian Muslims would prefer a daytime work shift during Ramadan so that they may break the fast with their families and attend evening prayers.
How can non-Muslim co-workers and friends help someone who is fasting?

Employers, co-workers and teachers can help by understanding the significance of Ramadan and by showing a willingness to make minor allowances for its physical demands. Special consideration can be given to such things as requests for vacation time, the need for flexible early morning or evening work schedules and lighter homework assignments. It is also very important that Muslim workers and students be given time to attend Eid prayers at the end of Ramadan. Eid is as important to Muslims as Christmas and Yom Kippur are to Christians and Jews. A small token such as a card (there are Eid cards available from Muslim bookstores) or baked goods given to a Muslim co-worker during Eid ul-Fitr would also be greatly appreciated. Hospital workers should be aware that injections and oral medications might break the fast. Patients should be given the opportunity to decide whether or not their condition exempts them from fasting.
Do people normally lose weight during Ramadan?

Some people do lose weight, but others may not. It is recommended that meals eaten during Ramadan be light, but most people can’t resist sampling special sweets and foods associated with Ramadan.

Deobandi Virus Capturing Gujrat Muslims

5 Aug

Moderates Fight To Hold Turf In Gujarat


Saeed Khan | TNN  5th Aug 2008


Ahmedabad: An intense power struggle is going on between the moderate and the hardline Muslim groups for control of the sizable Sunni population in Gujarat that accounts for nearly 90% of the five million Muslims in the state.
   Since the 2002 Gujarat riots the more radical Deobandis, who are flush with funds, are winning over turf from the moderate Barelvis. Not only more mosques are coming under the control of the Deobandis, but this orthodox school of Islam is also finding ready converts among youth coming from liberal and educated Muslim backgrounds.
   Apart from running madrassas, mainstream educational institutions have been the special focus for the Deobandis. While this power struggle is a pan-India phenomenon, it has assumed serious dimensions in Gujarat in the last six years. Recent clashes between the two groups in Surat, Kalol, Prantij, Himmatnagar and other towns and cities across Gujarat have only underlined this conflict.
   The tolerant Barelvis, who are okay with worship in dargahs, have even put up notice boards outside scores of mosques in Gujarat banning the entry of the Tablighi Jamaat, the missionary wing of the Deoband school of Islam which preaches a puritanical interpretation of Quran.
   The oldest Deobandi madrassa in Gujarat at Dabhel near Surat is over 100 years old and this explains why south Gujarat is supposedly a stronghold of the radicals. While the Deobandis have moved in a big way into other parts of Gujarat, stiff resistance is coming from the Barelvis from Saurashtra.
   Kadar Salot, president of the Rajkot Saher Sunni Muslim Juna Masjid Trust, says: ‘‘The Tablighis want friction in society while people of Rajkot do not want any trouble. This is the reason several mosques in Rajkot have banned their entry.’’ 

   Chairman of Porbandar Markaz-e-AhleSunnat Barkat-e-Raza Dar-ul-Ulum Abdul Sattar Hamdani says, ‘‘to keep Deobandis at a distance, the trustees of the mosques may have resorted to pasting of notices.’’


A signboard in front of a mosque in Rajkot tells hardliners to stay away

Ahmed Rida Khan ;The Neglected genius of the East

26 Jul

 

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Islamic scholar
Medieval era
Name Ahmed Raza Khan
Birth 1856
Death 1921
School/tradition Sunni
Main interests Aqeedah, Fiqh, Tasawwuf
Notable ideas Love of Holy Prophet
Influenced by Shaykh Abdul Qadir Jilani, Rumi, Shami, Shah Abdul Haq Muhaddith Dehlavi, Moulana Fazl-e-Haqq Khayrabadi
Influenced Crores of Sunni Muslims in the indian sub continent

Ahmad Raza Khan (1856-1921) was a Sunni Muslim scholar and sufi from Bareilly, a city in Northern India. He was a great writer, authoring nearly 1,000 books and monographs of varying lengths in Arabic, Persian and Urdu. He was a follower of Hanafi jurisprudence. His “magnus opus” is his fatawa Ridawiyya which comprised of 40 Volumes.

 Life history

 His Family and Childhood

.

Ahmad Rida Khan was born in 1272 AH (1856 CE) into a family of Alims (legal scholars). His father, Mawlānā Naqī Áli Khān, was an alim of his time. His mother named him Amman Miyān. He studied Islamic sciences mainly under the tutelage of his father. He undertook the traditional dars-e nizami course under his father’s supervision and thereafter was largely self-taught. He did not proceed to take a formal course at a dar al-ulum.

 Adolescence and start of his ministry

At the age of 14, Ahmad Raza, was given the responsibility of writing Fatawa (written answers to Islamic legal problems). It was through this path of life that he communicated to the masses to be steadfast to mainstream Islam – The Ahle-sunnah wal Jama’at. At this time there were many Pirs (Islamic Holy men) throughout northern India and Kashmir, each with their own dedicated group of followers. Most of these known Pirs and Saintly men were very impressed with the teachings (The Ahle-sunnah wa Jama’at) of Imam Ahmad Raza al-Qaadiri and looked at him as their role model and security against the corrupt cults that emerged within Islam.

 Adulthood

At 21 he received the blessing of one of the most outstanding Pir’s of the area and sent him out to make Sufi’s from anyone worthy. At 22 years of age while on Hajj with his father, he received many honours from some of the Sufi teachers of his time. Hajj was a turning point in his life. It inspired Imam Raza Khan to make followers throughout India and impart his teachings and knowledge on them. During his lifetime he wrote over 1000 books.

Aĥmed raza studied many sciences and fiqh (jurisprudence) particularly in the Hanafi school. He earned many authorizations to teach — by his own affirmation, the most important one was from the Mufti of Makkah, Shaykh Ábd ar-Raĥmān as-Sirāj ibn Ábdullāh as-Sirāj. This chain of transmission is claimed to reach back to Abu Hanifah.

Aĥmed Raza Khan took the Qadiri path and was initiated in that Sufi order by the Noble Sufi Master, Sayyid Khatimul-Akaabir Sha Ale-Rasul Ahmadi al-Husaini al-Qaadiri Barkaati of Mārahra (a town in northern India). He dedicated many tracts to the love of [[Aaqa Salal Laho Alaihe-wasalam], as is evident in his writings and endeavors.

In 1904 he founded a school, the Madrasa Manzar al-Islam. The position of chief administrator of this school was later to become a hereditary one within the Riza family for the next four generations. Raza died in 1340 AH (1921 CE), at the age of 65.

Authorization

He had many ijazahs (certificate of authority, authorization) in Hanafi fiqh including one from the Muftī of Makkah, Shaykh abd ar-Rahmān as-Siraj ibn Abdullāh as-Siraj (The Master of the Kaba or place of hajj). This chain of transmission reaches Imām Abū Hanifah in twenty seven links and in further four to Aaqa Salal Laho Alaihe-wasalam.

He took the Qadiri path and was initiated in that Sufi order by Allama Sayyid Shah Aale Rasool Hussaini Qadri Barkati Al-Hanafi ( Student of Allama Abdul Aziz Mohaddith e Dehalwi Al-Hanafi ) of Mārahra (a town in northern India) when he turned 21 years of age. He was a great lover of the Prophet Muhammad as is evident in his writings and endeavors. He was also a great poet who has to his name many and verses in Arabic, Persian and Urdu. The anthology of his Urdu and Persian verse is presented in a slim volume with two parts and named: ‘Hadayiq e Bakh’shish’ meaning ‘Gardens of Salvation’.

His works

Ahmed Raza was the author of nearly 1,000 books[citation needed] and monographs of varying lengths, as well as poetry, in Arabic, Persian and Urdu. Amongst the most well-known are the following:

  1. Kanzul Iman Fi Tarjamatu’l Qu’ran (The Treasure of Faith: A translation of the Quran) – This is his Urdu translation of the Quran. It combines fluency of language with Quranic exegesis and is an explanatory translation, as opposed to a literal one.
  2. Ĥadāyiq e Bakh’shish (Gardens of Salvation) – This is his slim two-volume anthology of Urdu and Persian poetry, eulogizing the Prophet Muhammad Peace Be Upon Him.
  3. Al- Átāyā an-Nabawiyyah fi’l Fatāwā ar-RiĎawiyyah (also known as Fatāwa ar-RiDawiyyah or Fatāwā Razwiyah) – His magnum opus, this is a collection of books, monographs and edicts on all aspects of Hanafī fiqh. The latest edition runs into 24 large volumes.
  4. Al-Dawlatul Makkiyah (The Meccan Treasure) – This is amongst his masterpieces and was written in a few days. It discusses, in great detail, the Prophet’s Knowledge of the Unseen ( ‘ilm al ghayb), one of the contentious issues between the Brailwees (ahlus sunnah wal jama’ah) and their opponents, notably the Deobandis.
  5. Husamul Haramain[1]

He also made several poems about Aaqa Salal Laho Alaihe-wasalam such as Lam Yati Nadhiruka Fi Nadharin (in Arabic Urdu, Hindi, and in Persian) and Zamin-o-Zaman which can be found in Ĥadāyiq e Bakh’shish.

Some famous books of Ahmad Raza: 1- Fatawa Radhvia (12 volunes) 2. Husamul Harmain 3. Fatawa Harmain 4. Addaulatul Makkiah 5. Fatawa Africa 6. Ahkame Shariat 7. Subhanussubbuh 8- Al-Amno-wal-ola 9- Dawamul Aish 10- Al Mohajjatul-Motamnah 11- Kiflul Faqihil Fahim 12- Alsamsaam 13- Samsamul Haidari 14- Saiful Mustafa 15- Maqale- Urafa 16- Badrul Anwar 17- Fauze Mobeen 18- Moine Mobeen 19- Alkalimatul Mulhama 20- Al-Aalamul -Aalam 21- Tadbeer Falaho Najateo Islah 22- Munabbehul Munia 23- Saltanete Mustafa 24- Nutque Hilal 25- Nafi-ul-Fai 26- Almobeen Khatamul Mobeen 27- Raddur Rafza 28- Kaifare Kufre Aarya 29- Kashful Illa 30- Risala Dar Ilmi Muthullath 31- Risala Dar Ilmi Takseer 32- Risala Jabro Muqabila 33- Risala Fi Ilm-il- Jafar 34- Taaje Tauqeet 35- Al Nahiul- Nameer 36- Hashia Usule Taba’ee 37- Al- Matrus Sayeed 38- Kanzul Iman 39- Hadaique- Bakhshish 40- Khalisul Itqad 41- Muneerul- Ain 42- Al Istimdad 43- Khatmul Nabuwah 44- Jiddul Mumtar 45- Tamheede Iman etc.

Branches of Knowledge

It is found that Ahmad Raza had proficiency in more than fifty branches of knowledge Arab scholars like Shaykh Ismail bin Khalil & Shaykh Musa Ali Shami while commenting on his reputation and his knowledge, Dr. Jamil Jalibi, Vice Chancellor, Karachi University (Pakistan) said:

“Mawlana Ahmed Raza Khan Barelvi was a Jurist, scholar, Naa’tia poet, an observer of Islam. His crowning scholarship can be imagined by the fact that he had knowledge of various sciences and humanities. He left behind more than a hundred booklets.”

Once, Sir Zia al-Din, a famous mathematician, was in a predicament with regards to part of his research in a mathematical field which meant he had to go to Berlin (Germany) to seek a solution to an intricate problem. It so happened that a certain Mawlana from the famous Aligarh University advised Sir Zia al-Din to visit Ahmad Raza to seek a solution for his mathematical problem. But, Sir Zia al-Din, not sounding very confident said, “What will an ordinary Mawlana like Mawlana Ahmed Raza be able to solve? He hasn’t even gone out of his city to gain knowledge, so it is obvious that his knowledge is very limited.” Nevertheless, after some convincing, he agreed to visit Bareily.

When he arrived in Bareily , he immediately went to Ahmad Raza. Presenting the intricate mathematical problem to Ahmad Raza he said, “I am now going to Germany. I will come back for the answer, that is, if you do manage to solve it.” As he was speaking, Ahmad Raza was busy writing and listening to him at the same time. As Sir Zia al-Din was about to leave, he handed him a sheet of paper. When Sir Zia al-Din read what was written on this paper, he realised that it contained the solution to his mathematical problem that had him so confused. Sir Zia’ al-Din, was later recorded to have said the following about Ahmad Raza:

“He was an un-assuming man of pleasant manners and morals, had deep insight in mathematics, although he was not formally educated by a teacher. It was an inner gifted inherent knowledge. My query pertained to a theory of knotting problems of mathematics, but his manner and explanation was spontaneous as if he had already carried out a research in it. Now, there is nobody so well-versed in India. Such a scholar, I think, there is none. Allah has bestowed upon him such a knowledge, that is amazing. His insight in the fields of mathematics, euclid, algebra and timings is astonishing. A mathematical problem that I could not solve despite my best of efforts, this learned man explained in a few moments.”

He was so much effected by Ahmad Raza that he became a true Muslim with a beard on his face.[dubious ] .

Intellectual Life

Imam Aĥmed Razaā’s spiritual and religious involvements seemingly encompassed his life. However, he was also a self-taught scientist in many fields and a mathematician. He acted upon his sincere belief of the Quran and Hadith mentioning that Islam and science are intertwined within each other. He wrote several treatises on several scientific fields. [2].

 Secularism

During the period of the Indian Khilafat Movement, Gandhi was advised that he should meet with Aĥmed Riđā. When he was told that the Gandhi wished to meet and speak to him, Aĥmed Riđā said, “What would he speak about? Religion or worldly affairs? If it is worldly affairs, what can I partake in, for I have abstained from the world and have no interest in it.” (Al Mizaan, p. 335)

 Imam Ahmed Raza’s Final Advice before his demise

01. Nothing with photos of living objects should be near me when my Ruh (Soul) leaves.
02. Recite Sura Yaseen and Sura Ra’ad beside me.
03. Recite Durood in abundance.
04. Keep those who are weeping away from me.
05. Give my Ghusl according to the Sunnah.
06. Either Mawlana Haamid Raza or Allamah Amjad Ali should perform my Janaza Salaah. (radi Allahu anhum)
07. Do not delay my Janazah.
08. When taking my Janazah, recite “Kaabe ke Badru Duja”.
09. Do not read anything in my praise.
10. Place me softly in the grave.
11. My grave should be dug according to my height.
12. My Kafan should be according to the Sunnah.
13. The food of my Fatiha must be given to the poor.
14. Haamid Raza must give a fair share of everything to Chothe Mia (Huzoor Mufti Azam Hind). If not, my Rooh will be displeased. (radi Allahu anhum)
15. All of you must remain steadfast on my Deen. Do not leave the path of Shariah. Stay on the Deen on which I was.

Towards Mirza Ghulam Ahmad

Mirza Ghulam Ahmad of Qadian, claimed to be the promised Messiah and Mahdi awaited by the Muslims. These claims proved to be extremely controversial among Muslims and he was branded as a heretic and apostate by many religious scholars of the time, including Ahmed Rida. To prove his point, when Ahmed Rida visited Mecca and Madina for pilgrimage in 1905, he prepared a draft document entitled “AlMotamad AlMustanad” (The Reliable Proofs) for presentation to the eminent scholars of Mecca and Madina-E-Pak. Ahmed Raza collected opinions of the Ulama of Hejaz and compiled them in a compendium written in Arabic language with the title, Husam al Harmain (The Sword of two sanctuaries), a work containing the thirty-three Ulamas’ thirty -four verdicts (20 Meccan and 13 Medinese Ulama). The overall import of this work was that Ghulam Ahmad’s beliefs were blasphemous and tantamount to apostasy.[3].

 His students

Prominent Muslim alims from the Indian sub-continent who were amongst the students of Aĥmed Razā Kahn Bralevi Rahma tulALLAh Alaihe are as follows:

  1. Muhammad Hamid Raza Khan Noori Barkaati
  2. Mustafa Raza Qadri Noori Barkaati (teacher of Shaykh Muhammad ibn Alawi al-Maliki)
  3. Abdus Salaam Jabalpuri ( Eidul Islam )
  4. Sayyid Shah Na’eemuddeen Muraadabadi ( Sadrul Afazil ) (teacher of Shaykh Muhammad Karam Shah al-Azhari)
  5. Sayyid Zafar’uddeen Bihaari
  6. Abdul Aleem Siddique
  7. Mufti Amjad Ali
  8. Ziyauddin Ahmad al-Qadiri al-Madani (teacher of Shaykh Muhammad Alawi al-Maliki and Hazrat Abdul Wahab Siddiqi)
  9. Burhaanul Haq Jabalpuri ( Burhan e Millat )
  10. Mawlana Mukhtar Ahmad Siddiqi Meerati
  11. Muhammad Abd al-Hayy
  12. Ahmad Khalil
  13. Ahmad Khudravi
  14. Muhammad bin Abi Bakr
  15. Muhammad Sa’id
  16. Mawlana Sayyid Ahmad Ashraf Ashrafi
  17. Mawlana Syed shah Sulayman Ashraf Bihari
  18. Hashmat Ali Khan ( Sher Besha’e )
  19. Sayyid Rasûl Shâh Khâkî Chakwali

Student’s students are too numerous to number, some of the most famous in Pakistan include Muhaddith-e-Azam Pakistan Allama Sardar Ahmad Qadri and Shaykh-ul-Qur’an Allama Abdul Ghafoor Hazarvi.

Jis ne baatil ke sir ko juka diya. Uus Sher-e-Bareilly pe Lakho Salaam.

 References

  • Baraka, A – A Saviour in a Dark World (Article) The Islamic Times, March 2003 Stockport, UK

Haroon, M The World of Importance of Imam Ahmad Raza Kazi Publications, Lahore 1974

Dargahs Of India: Sirhind Sharif

21 Jul

Dotting GT Road, away from the hustle and bustle of Chandigarh and somewhere between Ludhiana and Ambala, lies the dusty town of Sirhind that holds within itself important pages of Indian history book. Sirhind is mostly known among Muslims through Sheikh Ahmed Sirhindi, the famous Sufi of the Naqshbandi order who was conferred the title of Mujaddid Alif-sani.

Mujaddid, in Islamic tradition, refers to a person who, Muslims believe, is sent by God in the first half of every century of the Islamic calendar.

As it says in the hadith: “Allah shall raise for this Umma at the head of every century a man who shall renew (or revive) for it its religion” (Sunan Abu Dawud)

The Mujaddid’s objective is to revive Islam, remove from it any extraneous elements and to restore it to its pristine state. A Mujaddid might be a caliph, a founder of a sufi order, a saint (wali), a prominent teacher, a scholar or some other kind of influential person.Usually all those who are considered to be the Mujaddid may not compulsory that they claim. They can be recognize by their work for Islam and its revival. [Wikipedia]

Mujaddid Alif-sani would mean reviver of Islam in the second millennium. Even though his name was familiar, I never knew the exact location of Sirhind till a friend I was visiting in Chandigarh told me about it. It was the place where Ahmed al-Faruqi was born on the day of Ashura, the 10th of Muharram in the year 971 Hijri or 1564 AD.

He received his knowledge and education through his father and through many shaikhs in his time. He made progress in three tariqats: Suhrawardiyya, Qadiriyya, and Chistiyya. He was given permission to train followers in all three tariqats at the age of 17 years. He was busy in spreading the teachings of these tariqats and in guiding his followers, yet he felt that something was missing in himself and he was continuously searching for it. He felt an interest in the Naqshbandi Sufi Order, because he could see by means of the secrets of the other three tariqats that it was the best and highest. His spiritual progress eventually brought him to the presence of the Ghawth and Qutb of his time, ash-Shaikh Muhammad al-Baqi, who had been sent from Samarqand to India by the order of his shaikh, Muhammad al-Amkanaki. He took the Naqshbandi Order from the shaikh and stayed with him for two months and some days, until Sayyidina Muhammad al-Baqi opened to his heart the secret of this tariqat and gave him authorization to train his murids in the Order. [Wikipedia]

A high point of Sheikh Ahmed Sirhindi’s life was his confrontation with Akbar and then with his successor Jahangir. Things came to such a pass that he was incarcerated in the Fort of Gwalior for three years. Eventually, he was freed by the Emperor and went back to preaching in Sirhind where he died in 1624 AD. He is largely credited to have led the revival of Islam in India in the 16th-17th century. However, some scholars have criticized his role saying that he steered the intellectual discourse away from the liberal dogma during the times of Akbar and Jahangir. Others have criticized him for his alleged role in the assassination of Guru Arjan Dev, the fifth Guru of Sikhism, in 1606 at the hands of Jahangir who suspected Arjan Dev of helping his rebellious son, Khusrau.

Sheikh Ahmed SirhindSheikh Ahmed Sirhind

The entrance to his shrine is imposing and a mosque is situated adjacent to the shrine. The plaque at the top of the main gate reads:

bismillah ar rahmaan ar rahiim
laa ilaahaa illalaah muhammad rasuul allah

mazaar puranvaar Hazrat Imam Rabbani Mujaddid Alifsani Sheikh ahmed Faruqui Naqshbandi Sirhindi rahmat ullah alaihu

It roughly translates into:

In the name of Allah, Most Magnificent, Most Merciful
There is no God but Allah and Mohammad is His Messenger

The illuminated mausoleum of Hazrat Imam Rabbani Mujaddid Alifsani Sheikh ahmed Faruqui Naqshbandi Sirhindi (may Allah have mercy upon him)

The plaque also tells us that the construction was done in 1925 AD which is not is fairly recent. As it is the case with Taj Mahal the mausoleum of Sheikh Ahmed Sarhind is also built in two stories. A demo grave at the top and the actual grave at the bottom.

Demo Grave Sheikh Ahmed SirhindActual Grave Sheikh Ahmed Sirhind

WishesOne of the interesting sights at the mausoleum is this intricate marble work made colorful by wish-threads tied by the devotees. For every wish they solicit through Sheikh, the devotees tie a thread. Today Sirhind Sharif receives many of its visitors from other parts of North India who are going to Ajmer Sharif for the annual Urs and stop at Sirhind along the way. The population of Muslims is minuscule in Punjab and a large percentage consists of immigrant workers from Uttar Pradesh and Bihar.

Quite close to the dargah of Sheikh Ahmed Sirhindi stands Fatehgarh Sahib Gurudwara and holds an exalted status in the eyes of Sikhs. It is the place where the two younger sons of Guru Gobind Singh were bricked alive.

After the heroic death of two elder sons of Guru Gobind Singh, in the battle of Chamkaur, on December22, 1704 his two younger sons, namely, Zorawar Singh and Fateh Singh were done to death, by being bricked alive in the fort of Sirhind on December 28, 1704 by the order of the tyrant Nawab Wazir Khan. Mata Gujri, grandmother of the two Sahibzadas expired due to the shock of brutal murder of her two grand children. A Hindu Philanthropist Dewan Todar Mal cremated three dead bodies with the help of other devotees of the Guru. He purchased the land by paying gold coins to the muslim Zamindar named Atta. Here stands the Gurdwara Jyoti Swarup. A big hall with a seating capacity for 5,000 persons has been recently constructed. It has been named Dewan Todar Mal Hall. [All About Sikhs]

Gurudwara Fatehgarh Sahib

Sirhind, like many other places of historical importance dotting North Indian landscape has been largely forgotten but will feature prominently whenever we look back into the past.

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